• Online nursery only
  • $100 minimum order
  • First shipping date: April 19, 2022

Characteristics of the tree

Height at maturity
10 meters (35 feet)
Spacing
7.5 meters (25 feet)
Soil
Well drained
Sun / shade
Full sun
Flowering
Mid-May
Harvest
August-September
Years to bear
5
Self-fertile. Good pollinator
Latin name
Pyrus ussuriensis
Also known as
Ussurian pear, Harbin pear, or Manchurian pear
The Siberian pear tree, or Pyrus ussuriensis, makes an excellent pollinator: particularly for Ussuriensis-type pear trees such as Ure, Krazulya and Vekovaya. Its fruit are too astringent to eat fresh, but can be used to make a tasty vinegar.
Height
Availability
Price
Quantity
3-5 feet
Out of stock
Out of stock
$ 25.00
1-3 feet
Out of stock
Out of stock
$ 20.00

Attention! In order to produce fruit, this tree needs a another pear tree from a different cultivar nearby for pollination.

Delivery calculated at the time of payment.
Height at maturity
10 meters (35 feet)
Spacing
7.5 meters (25 feet)
Soil
Well drained
Sun / shade
Full sun
Flowering
Mid-May
Harvest
August-September
Years to bear
5
Self-fertile. Good pollinator
Latin name
Pyrus ussuriensis
Also known as
Ussurian pear, Harbin pear, or Manchurian pear

The Siberian pear tree (also known as Ussurian pear, Harbin pear or Manchurian Pear) is exceptionally hardy, thriving in areas up to zone 2. It is native to the Ussuri region of eastern Russia, for which it is named, and also to Japan and Korea. It is very beautiful, making a beautiful show of profuse pinkish white flowers in spring, with a long flowering period. In summer it is still very attractive, with its glossy leaves and low-hanging branches.

This tree has been used to breed new hardy cultivars of pear trees, including Ure, Vekovaya and Krazulya. It is an excellent pollinator for these pear trees, and we also use it as a rootstock for many of our hardy pear varieties. Its low-hanging branches also make it an excellent choice to use in a windbreak hedge. Its fruit is generally too astringent for humans to eat, but wildlife will be very happy to feed on it, and it can also be made into a very good vinegar. Be aware that the fallen fruit can be quite messy if they are not harvested.

Pear trees have a very vigorous and upright growth habit; becoming taller than apple trees (10 m/35 ft in height at maturity) but spreading less wide (6 m/20 ft) Their height can be controlled somewhat with rigorous pruning, but only to a certain degree. All going well, these trees will live for about 200 years, providing fruit for several future generations.
You should note that this illustration is meant only to give a general indication of what you can expect, and the growth of your tree might look somewhat different. The development of a tree depends on the soil type, irrigation, fertilisation and climatic conditions.

The evolution of a pear tre

All our pear trees are sold bare-root, without pots. They have been cultivated directly in the soil, and are taken out of the ground to be shipped to you during their period of dormancy. Bare-root trees do not take up much space, and can be therefore shipped by mail all over Canada!

Pear trees have a naturally small root system – do not be surprised if your pear tree seems to have fewer roots compared to the other trees you receive! This photo shows a 3-foot-tall pear tree, similar to one you would receive. Depending on the height that you select when you order a pear tree, it could be smaller (1-2 feet) or taller (3-5 feet).

Poirier à racines nues

Our pear trees are propagated by grafting, on rootstock that we produce at the nursery. For pear cultivars that are hardy in zone 3, we use Pyrus ussuriensis rootstock for its vigour and hardiness (zone 2, growing in Alaska). For cultivars that are hardy in zone 4, our rootstock consists of either Pyrus ussuriensis, or seedling pear trees born from the trees in our orchard in zone 4.

Grafting on full-size rootstocks

About half of the pear trees we offer are self-fertile and can produce fruit on their own, though they will always give better yields with a pollinator. The rest are self-sterile, and cannot produce fruit without pollination from a different cultivar. Therefore, if you only have space for one tree, you might want to use the filter to see only self-fertile cultivars.

Provided it is grown in good conditions and properly cared-for, your pear tree will begin to bear fruit by around 5 years on average, although this can vary depending on your location and the fertility of your soil. Be sure to also have a look at our articles on how to plant and care for your growing tree!

Pear tree pollination bloom