• Online nursery only
  • Orders from January 5, 2022
  • First shipping date: April 19, 2022

Characteristics of the tree

Height at maturity
1 meter (3 feet)
Spacing
1.8 meters (6 feet)
Soil
Well drained
Sun / shade
Full sun
Flowering
Mid to late May
Harvest
Early September
Average fruit weight
1.7
Fruit color
Blue-black
Years to bear
3
Self-fertile
Latin name
Vitis sp. Hogan
Average diameter of fruit
1.5cm
Brix
15
Hogan is an extremely productive and very tasty blue grape. Its flavour is complex and aromatic, reminiscent of Concord. It is one of the earliest varieties to ripen.
Height
Availability
Price
1-3 feet
TBA
$ 20.00

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Height at maturity
1 meter (3 feet)
Spacing
1.8 meters (6 feet)
Soil
Well drained
Sun / shade
Full sun
Flowering
Mid to late May
Harvest
Early September
Average fruit weight
1.7
Fruit color
Blue-black
Years to bear
3
Self-fertile
Latin name
Vitis sp. Hogan
Average diameter of fruit
1.5cm
Brix
15

Hogan is a small to medium, dark blue seeded grape. Its skin is moderately thick and detaches very easily from the pulp. It is tart and sweet, with acidity slightly dominating and an intense, aromatic and complex flavour. The taste is overall somewhat reminiscent of Concord, or perhaps the blue Ontarian grape that one can find in grocery stores. It is very agreeable to eat fresh, despite the seeds (although some people actually enjoy this crunchy element!) The Hogan grape ripens early and can be harvested over a period of a couple of weeks. Its flavour improves if it is left on the vine for a week or so after it first begins to appear ripe, with more flavour and a higher sugar content. We use this grape mainly as a table grape for fresh eating, but its flavour would also surely be interesting when turned into juice, perhaps in a mixture with another sweeter variety.

Hogan is a hardy and very productive grapevine. One vine can produce more than 8kg of fruit in a year (although this will vary depending on the season, pollination, sunlight and other factors.) It is one of the earliest-ripening varieties, its harvest period beginning at the end of August (in zone 4). It is hardy to at least zone 4, but would probably be worth trying in zone 3 with snow cover.

We came across this grape vine in our home village of Sainte Julienne, on the old abandoned farm of Mr. Hogan. Hogan was a salesman, who amassed a collection of plants he had discovered while travelling around the country. We named this variety in his honour!

Grape vine illustration
vigne racines nues grape vine bare rooted

When planning where to plant your grapevines and what kind of supporting structure to use, you might want to consider the possibility of laying down the vines under the snow for the winter. While all the cultivars we offer are hardy to at least zone 4, and therefore should not need extra protection for winter, we prefer to be on the safe side. Therefore, after we have pruned our grapevines in fall, we lay down the branches on the ground so that they will be insulated by the snow during the winter. We designed our fence with this in mind: you can see how we made it here. This might not be necessary in warmer zones, but is something you should consider if you are in zone 4a or colder.